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Draft : : Story
American League Draft Impressions
Published: Monday, June 11, 2012

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National League Draft Impressions

Another draft is in the books, and while we're only a day removed from the process, it is time to take an early look as to how the teams fared.

The overlying theme in this year's draft obviously will be on the signing process.  With the new signing restrictions and draft pools, that alone created a controversial topic that became even more evident as the picks were made over the course of the three days of the 2012 First Year Player Draft.  While that theme will remain evident through this year's signing deadline, which is Friday, July 13, I'm going to try to keep the focus of these stories on the talent that each team looks to add to their systems.

Of course it takes at least two to three years to determine just how successful any one team's draft effort was. And if you asked any of the 30 teams in Major League Baseball about how they fared, they are going to be quick to point out how excited they are about the players they selected.

As part of a two part series (American/National League) I'm going to provide a quick synopsis of the notable players each team selected, the best late-round pick (after round 10), a wild card, and the key to what will allow this year's draft to be viewed as an eventual success.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

American League East

Baltimore Orioles
Draft pool: $6,826,900

Top pick:
Kevin Gausman, RHP, Louisiana State, 4th overall
Synopsis:
With no extra, or lost picks in the top 10 rounds, the Orioles took a relatively conservative approach to the draft, selecting college players with eight of their top 10 selections.  Kevin Gausman, who along with Mark Appel, was considered the top college pitcher available for this year's draft, and was a candidate to go first overall.  Gausman was the team's first pick, and he alone could define this draft.  Similar to the team selecting Dylan Bundy with the fourth overall pick last year, the Orioles may just have landed yet another premier arm, and Gausman could move up toward the big leagues at a similar pace, giving Baltimore a pair of arms that could define their rotation in 2-3 years.  Branden Kline was their second round pick, another live arm that had mixed results this past year, his first serving as a starter for Virginia.  Lex Rutledge (6th), Matt Price (7th) and Brady Wager (9th) are three more promising arms selected from the college ranks in the top 10 rounds that could give the Orioles exciting pitching depth.  Among the hitters, Christian Walker (4th) and Torsten Boss (8th) enjoyed productive careers at South Carolina and Michigan State respectively, while prep infielder Adrian Marin (3rd) has smooth defensive actions and a promising bat.
Late Round Gem:
Derick Velazquez (15th round). Velazquez enjoyed a big bump in velocity as a freshman at Merced CC, peaking in the mid-90s with a promising curve and a very projectable frame.
Wild Card:
Ryan Ripken (20th round). The son of Cal doesn't have his father's overall promise, and as a 20th round pick many expect Ryan Ripken to honor his commitment to South Carolina.  However, this pick may have been made as more than just a favor to his Hall of Fame father, as the Orioles didn't select any players with perceived signability issues in the top 10 rounds and may be able to add the younger Ripken to their system.
Key to Success:
While the Orioles are enjoying a unexpected, successful season at the big league level, they're going to need several of their picks over the last few years to pan out to make sure they don't continue to select among the top 4-5 overall picks every year.  Kevin Gausman has the greatest potential and therefore his ultimate progression is crucial for the Orioles future success.

Boston Red Sox
Draft pool: $6,884,800

Top pick:
Deven Marrero, SS, Arizona State, 24th overall
Synopsis:
With an additional first round and supplemental first-round pick, the Boston Red Sox have a relatively larger draft pool to work with.  Under new management, the team took a conservative approach with their first three picks, taking a trio of college players in shortstop Deven Marrero (1st round), left-hander Brian Johnson (first) and right-hander Pat Light (1S).  Marrero may require a larger bonus than what has been assigned to the 24th overall pick since he entered the spring as one of the favorites to go first overall, but for the most part they shouldn't have a problem signing these three players.  Prep right-hander Jamie Callahan was the team's second round pick, and any savings in their draft pool will likely be used to pry another prep righty, Ty Buttrey (4th), who was projected to be selected in the first or sandwich rounds prior to the draft, away from Arkansas.  Third round pick Austin Maddox is another live armed righty who could be inserted into a starting role to start his professional career, and could flourish thanks to a low- to mid-90s fastball and dynamite slider.
Late Round Gem:
Jamal Martin (11th round), Carson Fulmer (15th). Martin is an outfielder with game changing speed and a promising bat, while Fulmer has an electric arm that may be best suited to the bullpen.  The Red Sox will have to be creative with their draft pool to be able to sign either away from Florida State and Vanderbilt respectively
Wild Card:
Buttrey.
Key to Success:
After being one of the more aggressive teams when it came to draft signings in recent years, the new rules implemented by the new CBA took away their previous advantage of out-signing nearly everyone.  Having Marrero fall to their laps could be huge for them should he hit more like he did during the summer of 2011 on the Cape and for Team USA, as his defense alone could allow him to move quickly.

New York Yankees
Draft pool: $4,192,200

Top pick:
Ty Hensley, RHP, Santa Fe HS, Okla., 30th overall
Synopsis:
Armed with an additional second round pick after they failed to sign left-hander Sam Stafford from the 2011 draft, the Yankees took a trio of high school players with their first four selections.  The big bodied, live armed Hensley was the first of these picks, the second to last overall selection in the first round.  Toolsy outfielder Austin Aune was the second of their selections, with slugging first baseman Nathan Mikolas going in the third round.  The team's second round selection came in the form of big hitting backstop Peter O'Brien, who many believed could sneak into the latter third of the first round thanks to a big season at the plate for Miami.  The rest of their picks in the top 10 rounds focused on college players, both pitchers and hitters.  Right-handers Corey Black (4th round) and Nick Goody (6th) may fit best in the bullpen down the road, as both have electric fastball-breaking balls combos.  Infielder Rob Refsnyder (5th) is a good all-around athlete with solid overall tools, while outfielder Taylor Dugas (8th) is a senior sign with a compact frame yet leadoff profile thanks to his speed and all-out approach.
Late Round Gem:
Dayton Dawe (15th round). With a projectable frame and good command of a three-pitch mix, including a sinking upper-80s to low-90s fastball that projects to add velocity as he adds strength, Dawe was one of the top prospects available north of the border this year.
Wild Card:
Dawe, Caleb Frare (11th round).  Getting Dawe and/or Frare added to their system will likely take some creativity with their draft pool, as the two may be more likely to honor their commitments to Maine and Utah respectively.
Key to Success:
The Yankees had a nice mix of hitters and pitchers from both high school and college among their picks in the top 10 rounds, with Hensley's upside standing out the most thanks to a low- to mid-90s fastball and vastly improved hammer curve.  That could allow Hensley to move relatively quickly towards New York.

Tampa Bay Rays
Draft pool: $3,871,000

Top pick:
Richie Shaffer, 3B, Clemson, 25th overall
Synopsis:
Considered by many to be the most creative teams when it comes to the draft, the Rays didn't have the same boon of extra, early picks this year as they did a year ago, when they owned 10 first-round selections.  They were able to sit back with the 25th overall pick and simply see which players fell to them, and that came in the form of hard-hitting corner infielder Richie Shaffer, who enjoyed a big year at the plate for Clemson.  Four of their next five picks came from the prep ranks, including infielder Spencer Edwards (2nd round), outfielder Bralin Jackson (5th) and projectable right-handed pitchers Nolan Gannon (4th) and Damion Carroll (6th).  Speedy, toolsy outfielder Andrew Toles (2nd) was considered the second best prospect from the junior college ranks after Western Nevada right-hander Dylan Baker, while hard hitting backstop Luke Maile (8th) and projected leadoff hitting outfielder Joey Rickard (9th) enjoyed big springs for Kentucky and Arizona respectively.
Late Round Gem:
Dylan Floro (13th round). While Floro isn't over-powering, he has enjoyed success at the college level for three years at Cal State Fullerton, and shows an advanced sense for pitching and changing speeds with a well-rounded three-pitch repertoire.
Wild Card:
None.  The Rays took a few players such as Edwards, Gannon and Carroll higher than where some had them projected, which should allow the team to add them to the organization.
Key to Success:
No team has been better at drafting and developing talent in the last 5-6 years, so it's simply a matter of keeping that pipeline flowing.

Toronto Blue Jays
Draft pool: $8,830,800

Top pick:
D.J. Davis, OF, Stone County HS, Miss., 17th overall
Synopsis:
The Blue Jays have one of the larger draft pools thanks to an additional first-round pick and three sandwich round selections.  They certainly didn't employ a conservative approach given those extra picks, taking a wealth and variety of talent that started with the game-changing Davis and left-handed pitcher Matt Smoral (1S), who entered the spring as a likely top 5-10 overall pick as the top lefty available for this year's draft.  Reports indicate that Smoral may have already agreed to terms, and the team will have to be creative to make that signing happen, likely signing several of their other top picks for less than the projected slot.  Those other early selections include Duke right-hander Marcus Stroman (1st round), who has electric stuff and only fell to the 22nd overall pick due to his smallish stature, hard hitting corner infielder Mitch Nay (1S), projectable prep right-handers Tyler Gonzales (1S) and Chase DeJong (2nd) and athletic two-sport star Anthony Alford (3rd).  The rest of the team's picks in the top 10 rounds all hail from the college ranks.
Late Round Gem:
Ryan Kellogg (12th round). Given how aggressive the Blue Jays were with their early picks, they likely will have to play the hometown angle to get Kellogg, the top Canadian prospect eligible for this year's draft, signed.
Wild Card:
Alford.  Alford made it clear prior to the draft that he intended to honor his two-sport commitment to Southern Miss., although some dismissed that statement as posturing as the draft approached.
Key to Success:
The main key for the Blue Jays is simply getting most of their early picks signed, which will be no easy task.  If they do, they had one of the best drafts of any team, with plenty of players that could make an impact at the big-league level 3-5 years down the road.

American League Central

Chicago White Sox
Draft pool: $5,915,100

Top pick:
Courtney Hawkins, OF, Carroll HS, Texas, 13th overall
Synopsis:
With their first two picks, which included a supplemental first rounder, the White Sox added a pair of hard hitting 2011 Perfect Game All-Americans in Courtney Hawkins and Keon Barnum.  Hawkins is a dynamic slugger that could develop as a prototypical right fielder, while Barnum has been compared to Ryan Howard given his size and prodigious power potential.  Georgia Southern right-hander Chris Beck fell to their second round pick after an inconsistent spring, and could be a great pick if he picks up where he left off after the summer of 2011.  Fellow live-armed right-handers Brandon Brennan (4th round) and Kyle Hansen (6th) were added among their top 10 round picks, as Brennan was one of the top prospects available from the juco ranks while Hansen has a dynamic fastball-slider one-two punch.  Third-round pick Joey DeMichele led the Sun Devils in hitting this past spring, while another college infielder, Micah Johnson (9th), has an athletic profile with solid tools across the board and is the type of player the White Sox covet.  Prep infielder Nick Basto (5th) has good size and current strength with promising offensive tools.
Late Round Gem:
Zac Fisher (27th round), Jason Coats (29th). Fisher has put up big numbers at New Mexico State as a big-bodied backstop with a strong arm, while Coats did the same during his sophomore year at TCU, but hasn't been the same since the new BBCOR bats were introduced in 2011.
Wild Card:
Basto.  The White Sox should be able to sign Basto, but he poses the great signability risk among their early round selections.
Key to Success:
The White Sox preference for toolsy, well-rounded athletic players and college pitching was evident among their early picks.  Hawkins appears to be a perfect fit for the team, and looked good in the classic Sox' uniform performing his on-stage back-flip on the first day of the draft. 

Cleveland Indians
Draft pool: $4,582,900

Top pick:
Tyler Naquin, OF, Texas A&M, 15th overall
Synopsis:
While many view the Indians selection of Naquin with the 15th overall selection as a safe pick, he was one of the most polished hitters available in this year's draft class, and is a well-rounded overall athlete with good, not great speed and a cannon for an outfield arm.  If his power develops, and if he's able to play centerfield, this pick could look incredibly astute in the near future.  They followed up that selection with a pair of prep right-handers in Mitchell Brown (2nd round) and Kieran Lovegrove (3rd).  Brown has a sturdy build and very good present-day stuff, while Lovegrove is more of a classic projection pick with a long, rangy frame and developing stuff.  The team's fourth-round pick, D'Vone McClure, may not have Naquin's polish, but he is a very good overall athlete with exciting tools.  The top junior college prospect, right-hander Dylan Baker, fell to the team's fifth round pick, and he could move quickly thanks to a mid-90s fastball and two potentially dominant breaking balls.
Late Round Gem:
Nelson Rodriguez (15th round).  Few can match the sheer strength and power potential of Rodriguez, who won the home run derby at the 2011 Perfect Game All-American Classic with an impressive display at spacious Petco Park.
Wild Card:
Rodriguez.  It will take more than the allotted $100,000 for players taken after the 10th round to keep Rodriguez away from Central Arizona College.
Key to Success:
The Indians quietly had a solid draft, with a nice mix of polish and tools among the positional prospects they took, as well as projectability and raw stuff among the pitchers.  Naquin could advance quickly, and could settle in centerfield for years to come.


Detroit Tigers
Draft pool: $2,099,300

Top pick:
Jake Thompson, RHP, Rockwall-Heath HS, Texas, 91st overall
Synopsis:
After finishing the 2011 season with the fifth best record in all of Major League Baseball, and the team's signing of free agent slugger Prince Fielder, the Tigers' first selection didn't come until the second round, the 91st overall selection, which also gave them the second smallest draft pool.  Most of that money will likely go toward signing Thompson, a strongly built right handed pitcher with a live arm out of Texas.  He and third-round pick, multi-tooled infielder/outfielder Austin Schotts, also from Texas, were the only players the Tigers took from the prep ranks in the top 10 rounds, a clear indication of the limitations of such a small signing pool.  Pitching was their primary focus, adding college right-handers Drew Verhagan (4th round) and Hudson Randall (7th), as well as lefties Joe Rogers (5th) and Jordan John (6th).  Verhagen is the hardest thrower of this group, as both Randall and John rely more on changing speeds to upset opposing hitters' timing than by blowing them away.
Late Round Gem:
Dylan LaVelle (18th round), Logan Ehlers (20th). LaVelle is a hard hitting infielder from the Pacific Northwest whose commitment to Oregon State makes it unlikely the Tigers sign him.  Ehlers prospect status took off this year as a prospect after transferring to Howard College, and he may be better off returning to school with a commitment of his own to Texas Tech.
Wild Card:
Limited bonus pool.  With just over $2 million to spend, unless the Tigers are willing to be penalized for going over that figure, that money isn't expected to get them very far.
Key to Success:
Prince Fielder.  His signing ultimately led to the restrictions the Tigers scouting department faced this year.  The development of Thompson and Schott, assuming they sign, is going to determine whether or not this was a successful drafting effort given the limited picks and resources to work with.

Kansas City Royals
Draft pool: $6,101,500

Top pick:
Kyle Zimmer, RHP, U. of San Francisco, 5th overall
Synopsis:
For the second year in a row the Royals followed the Orioles in the draft order with the fifth overall selection, but unlike the Orioles the Royals aren't enjoying an upstart season in the standings.  After taking one of the most dynamic pure athletes a year ago in local product Bubba Starling, they took a big-bodied power college arm in Kyle Zimmer this year.  He has already agreed to terms below the $3.5 million allotted to the fifth overall pick, and the Royals will likely be patient with him this summer as he's still rehabbing from hamstring and groin injuries.  The Royals focus remained on pitching with each of their next two picks, plucking up a pair of left-handers in Sam Selman (2nd round) and Colin Rodgers (3rd).  Rodgers has also agreed to terms, and all three continue to stockpile a strong Royals system with projectable arms.  The team turned its focus to positional prospects after taking Rodgers in the third, picking up infielders Kenny Diekroeger (4th), and Jackson Willeford (12th), catcher Chad Johnson (5th) and outfielders Fred Ford (7th) Alfredo Escalera (8th) and Alexis Rivera (10th).  Sixth-round pick, prep right-hander Zach Lovvorn (6th), has a lithe, live frame and improving arm strength.
Late Round Gem:
Austin Fairchild (16th round). It may seem unlikely at first glance that the Royals would be able to pry prep left-handed pitcher Fairchild, a 2011 Perfect Game All-American, away from TCU, but they saved a little money at the top with Zimmer's deal to possibly make that happen.
Wild Card:
Diekroeger.  It wouldn't be surprising to see Diekroeger, who was drafted in the second round out of high school only to attend Stanford, to return for his senior season.
Key to Success:
The Royals spent half of their draft pool on Zimmer, making him the most important piece from this year's draft for Kansas City.

Minnesota Twins
Draft pool: $12,368,200

Top pick:
Byron Buxton, OF, Appling County HS, Ga., 2nd overall
Synopsis:
For the months leading up to the draft, the word that circulated around the industry point out that Byron Buxton wouldn't make it past the top three overall picks.  He didn't make it past the Twins with the second overall selection, and they even had their choice between Buxton and Stanford ace Mark Appel.  There are still plenty of questions about Buxton's ability to hit, but his speed, arm strength and overall athleticism are incredibly special, and most believe that he'll make it to the big leagues on the merits of his athletic talent alone.  With two supplemental first-rounders and an extra second round selection, the Twins stayed aggressive in the early rounds thanks to having the largest draft pool of all teams, taking live-armed right-handers Jose Orlando Berrios, Luke Bard and J.T. Chargois, as well as left-hander Mason Melotakis, with their four picks after Buxton.  Eight of their next 10 picks were from the college ranks, including powerful slugging outfielder Adam Brett Walker (3rd round), versatile second baseman L.J. Mazzilli (9th), left-handed pitcher Taylor Rogers (11th) and right-handers Zach Jones (4th), Tyler Duffey (5th), Christian Powell (8th), D.J. Baxendale (10th) and Alexander Muren (12th).
Late Round Gem:
Erich Knab (13th round). With a tall, projectable frame and long, wiry strong limbs to go along with the present-day ability to peak in the mid-90s, it's easy to see Knab throwing consistently harder in 2-3 years.
Wild Card:
Luke Bard.  Bard had taken well to being inserted into Georgia Tech's starting rotation, where he maintained his low- to mid-90s velocity and nasty slider well, before sustaining a strained lat muscle injury.
Key to Success:
Buxton.  The Twins had plenty of extra, early picks, but this draft will be defined by whether or not Buxton fulfills his superstar potential.

American League West

Los Angeles Angels
Draft pool: $1,645,700

Top pick:
R.J. Alvarez, RHP, Florida Atlantic, 114th overall
Synopsis:
It's hard to blame the Angels for having the smallest draft pool in all of baseball after signing Albert Pujols and C.J. Wilson during the 2011-12 offseason.  Because of that their first pick came in the third round, the 114th overall selection; the Padres and Blue Jays had already made seven picks each by that time.  That isn't added to dismiss the talents of right handed pitcher R.J. Alvarez, who was one of the top hurlers on the Cape during the summer of 2010, and has an electric one-two punch thanks to his fastball/slider combo.  Overall the Angels loaded up on college players, pitchers and positional prospects up the middle.  Fellow right-handers Mark Sappington (5th round) and Austin Adams (8th) were among their picks in the top 10 rounds, as were left-handers Michael Roth (9th) and Chris O'Grady.  Second baseman Alex Yarbrough (4th) enjoyed a huge season at the plate for Ole Miss, and Eric Stamets (6th) has middle infield actions and good speed on the basepaths.  Not surprisingly due to their signing restrictions the team took only one high school player in the top 10 rounds, catcher Andrew Patterson (7th).
Late Round Gem:
Reid Scoggins (15th round).  Another member of a very talented Howard College team, Scoggins was considered one of the better prospects available from the junior college ranks.
Wild Card:
Jonathan Walsh (11th round). While he hit .280 for Texas, Walsh finally got regular playing time and started to show his power potential (six home runs) after participating in the 2008 PG/Aflac All-American Classic.
Key to Success:
Similar to the Tigers, the success of this draft really comes down to how far Pujols and Wilson take the Angels during the length of their respective contracts.

Oakland Athletics
Draft pool: $8,469,500

Top pick:
Addison Russell, SS, Pace HS, Fla., 11th overall
Synopsis:
It's best trying not to guess who the A's will take from one year to the next, because just as quickly as people have them pegged as a safe, "college-only" team, they take a high school positional prospect with incredible offensive potential.  Russell shows great bat speed and power potential, and has done a great job focusing on his conditioning to silence questions about his current, and future, ability to stick at shortstop.  With two sandwich picks and an extra second rounder, the A's stayed with prep bats with their next two picks, taking corner infielders Daniel Robertson and Matt Olson, both of whom also have exciting potential at the plate.  They added another prep bat in outfielder B.J. Boyd (4th round), and added projectable high school left-handed pitcher Kyle Twomey with their third-round pick.  Their second of two second round picks, college right-hander Nolan Sanburn, was more typical of their recent draft history, and each of their picks from the fifth to 10th rounds also came from the college ranks.  Among the more notable of those picks are right-handed pitchers Seth Streich (6th round), Kris Hall (8th) and Dakota Bacus, and catcher Max Muncy (5th).
Late Round Gem:
Matt Gonzalez (11th round).  In previous years, the 11th round was hardly considered a late round, but that's all changed now, and it may be difficult for the A's to pry Gonzalez away from Georgia Tech.
Wild Card:
None.  It has already been reported in South Florida newspapers that Russell will sign with the A's, otherwise none of their other picks should pose a severe signability risk.
Key to Success:
By bucking recent trends it seemed clear that the A's were looking for big bats in this year's draft after selecting a lot of solid players in recent years that lack impact potential.  How much Russell, Robertson and Olson hit to help change that will go a long way in defining the success of the A's in the years to come.

Seattle Mariners
Draft pool: $8,223,400

Top pick:
Mike Zunino, C, Florida, 3rd overall
Synopsis:
Although the Mariners had only one extra, early compensatory selection (a supplemental third round pick after not signing 2011 third-round pick Kevin Cron), they picked third overall in each and every round garnered the Mariners one of the largest draft pools in all of baseball.  If they're able to sign their top pick, Florida catcher and the 2011 SEC Player of the Year, Mike Zunino, for less than the projected $5.2 million, they could be able to spread the wealth among several of their aggressive picks.  After taking Zunino in the first, they shifted their focus to the high school crop, taking hard-hitting infielder Joe DeCarlo (2nd round), live-armed Puerto Rican righty Edwin Diaz (3rd) and loose and projectable lefty Tyler Pike (3S) with their next three selections.  Sixth round infielder Timmy Lopes and eighth round first baseman Nick Halamandaris also were selected out of high school.  Third baseman Patrick Kivlehan (4th) came out of almost nowhere to enjoy a big season at the plate after finishing up his college football career to focus on baseball, while Chris Taylor (5th) has smooth, graceful defensive actions up the middle of the infield.
Late Round Gem:
Blake Hauser (13th round). Hauser was expected to go much earlier than the 13th round, and because of that will take money greater than slot value.
Wild Card:
Zunino.  Zunino will sign, that isn't in question, but for how much is.  The Mariners were very aggressive with a lot of their picks going all the way to the end of the draft and 40th round James Kapriellan, and however much they save early could allow them to sign a few of those late rounders.
Key to Success:
Since the Mariners selected third overall without any extra first or second round picks, Mike Zunino's eventual success will effectively define this draft class.  That said, there is quite a bit of talent to point to past Zunino, especially if they get creative in the late rounds.

Texas Rangers
Draft pool: $6,568,200

Top pick:
Lewis Brinson, OF, Coral Springs HS, Fla., 29th overall
Synopsis:
This wasn't by design, but the best draft effort was saved for last.  The two-time defending American League Champion Texas Rangers enjoyed a boon in the early rounds of the draft, and showed an aggressive approach by picking up a few players early that have perceived signability issues.  After taking the tall, rangy and athletic Lewis Brinson with their first pick, they stopped Joey Gallo's slide by taking him with their first of two supplemental first round picks.  Right-handed pitcher Collin Wiles was the second of these picks, as he and athletic two-sport star Jamie Jarmon (2nd round) and college catcher Patrick Cantwell (3rd) were taken a little higher than expected which should help the Rangers sign their aggressive selections.  The second of said picks comes in the form of their second of two second round picks, Nick Williams, whose upside is near limitless, similar to Gallo.  Right handed pitcher Alec Asher (4th) offered one of the most powerful arms from the junior college crop, while outfielders Preston Beck (5th) and Royce Bollinger (6th) added two more potentially dynamic athletes to their impressive draft haul.
Late Round Gem:
Jameis Winston (15th round). In a draft full of impressive athletes, Winston is the best of them all, but is also the most unlikely to sign given his two-sport aspirations to play at Florida State.
Wild Card:
Williams.  I don't think anyone can argue with Williams' talent, but it's the finer points of his game that need work.  From Ken Griffey Jr. to Barry Bonds, he has drawn some incredibly unfair comparisons, but it's an indication of his potential.
Key to Success:
Even if this draft class doesn't pan out as a whole, you have to give the Rangers extra credit for creativity.  There is so much upside it's hard to imagine 2-3 players not emerging to become productive regulars at the big league level.


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